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Member Spotlight

Chris VandenAkker


Member Since: Dec 25, 2002
Posts: 21
Newest Members

Kesselsdorf, Germany
Trinidad s/n 870
Tauranga, New Zealand
Tampico s/n 219
Sceaux, France
Trinidad s/n 435
Berlin, Germany
Trinidad s/n 1870
Bargara, QLD
Tobago s/n 259
Bristol, United Kingdom
Tobago s/n 289
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Jets Land Safely After Air Race Midair

Two aircraft were able to land safely after a midair during a Jet Class heat at the 55th annual National Championship Air Races at Reno-Stead Airport (RTS) near Reno, Nevada, last Friday. The two Aero L-39 Albatros jets made contact when “Reality Czech,” piloted by Nathan Harnagel, was attempting to overtake “Race 37,” piloted by Alexandre Eckmann.

NASA Project Backs Three New Aviation Concepts

NASA has announced that it will be allocating resources for three aviation-oriented ideas as part of its Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) project. The ideas selected for the project's 2019 fiscal year are a seamless composite assembly technique, new ways to reduce and shed heat generated by an electric motor, and replacing lithium in batteries with a water-based option.

Final LAANC Installment Goes Live

The last piece of the FAA's Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) system, which allows “near real-time processing of airspace authorizations” for drone operators, went live last week, according to a statement made by FAA Acting Administrator Dan Elwell.

SpaceX Introduces First Passenger For Moon Flight

SpaceX has announced that Japanese fashion entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa has purchased a flight around the moon on the company's still-conceptual Big Falcon Rocket (BFR). Maezawa, who is also an avid art collector, says he will be offering six to eight artists free seats for the flight in the hope that they will be inspired to create work based on the trip.

Frasca Named Navy Subcontractor

Flight simulator manufacturer Frasca International announced that it has been named subcontractor for the Navy TH-57 Aircrew Training Services Contract on Monday. Frasca says it will be providing ten Flight Simulation Training Devices (FTDs) as part of the ground-based training systems for the TH-57 helicopter.

Aviation Safety


Download The Full September 2018 Issue PDF

Many of today’s workplaces seek to create a formalized “safety culture,” an environment where employees practice behaviors that minimize accidents, look out for their co-workers and where reporting unsafe conditions is encouraged, not subject to retaliation, and frequently rewarded. It can be a great goal, but it often creates an exaggerated sense of safety where people need safety training to use a power strip and posters about how to get out of a car without tripping. The goal of creating a safety culture often ends up a corporate farce, since the best safety cultures are not created by artifice, but happen naturally because people really care.

Bad Yokes

During a scheduled inspection, technicians encountered corroded and bent control yoke boss attachment hardware that proved difficult to remove. After consulting with the manufacturer, the final recommendation was to remove the boss via cutting the bolts (p/n 2315152-33). Manufacturer was able to repair the yoke assembly using SB 31-27-11 and kit 2381602-801. Aircraft had been parked outside without gust locks.

Pothole

The landing was normal, and I took a close look at the left landing gear after shutting down but couldn’t find anything amiss. The tire and wheel looked good, and there was no hydraulic fluid seeping from the strut. The brake was secure and had tested fine on the landing, and when taxiing in. There was no damage to the wing, the landing gear door or any other part of the airplane. Not finding anything wrong with the airplane I forgot about it, wondering if I had imagined it. Ultimately, I figured I’d hit a dog with the landing gear and, sadly, someone had lost their pet.

NTSB Reports

The pilot later stated he selected the landing gear handle to the down position, but the main landing gear did not lock in the extended position. He then selected the landing gear handle up, but the landing gear did not retract. After maneuvering away from the airport, an attempt to pump down the gear with the emergency hand pump was unsuccessful. An airframe-mounted mirror indicated the left landing gear was down. During the landing, the right main landing gear collapsed and the airplane veered to the right and departed the runway surface, coming to rest on the parallel taxiway.

It’s Your Job To Check

There’s an opinion among some pilots and mechanics that inspections and scheduled maintenance can do more harm than good. By constantly disassembling and reassembling an aircraft to inspect it, they argue, we’re prematurely wearing out the aircraft and actually making it less safe. Those same pilots and mechanics note that this is largely true, in their opinion, for aircraft that aren’t flown very much. For more active aircraft, however, they acknowledge that regular inspections and maintenance are less intrusive and, in fact, beneficial.

FAA


Hurricane Florence: Information for Drone Operators

September 19 UpdateThe FAA has established a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) over Wilmington, NC, to provide a safe environment for Hurricane Florence response and recovery flights. The TFR is in a 20 nautical mile (23 statute mile) radius of Wilmington International Airport from the ground up to 5,000 feet. Aircraft pilots and drone operators always should check NOTAMs before flying in the area. http://tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_8_4127.htmlThe agency also is reactivating theLow Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC)Fayetteville, Florence, Jacksonville and Wilmington airports in North Carolina and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina today. LAANC enables drone operators to receive real-time airspace authorizations.September 14 UpdateThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Special Notice restricting drone operations supporting Hurricane Florence recovery efforts to an altitude of 200 feet above the ground while operating in North and South Carolina. As a reminder, all drone operators are required to give way to manned aircraft at all times. September 12 UpdateThe Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is warning drone owners and operators they may face significant fines if they interfere with emergency response operations in the areas affected by Hurricane Florence.Many aircraft that are conducting life-saving missions and other critical response and recovery efforts are likely to be flying at low altitudes over areas affected by the storm. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may unintentionally disrupt rescue operations and violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.Government agencies with an FAA Certificate of Authorization (COA) or flying under Part 107, as well as private sector Part 107 drone operators who want to support response and recovery operations, are strongly encouraged to coordinate their activities with the local incident commander responsible for the area in which they want to operate.If drone operators need to fly in controlled airspace or a disaster TFR to support the response and recovery, operators must contact the FAAs System Operations Support Center (SOSC) by emailing 9-ATOR-HQ-SOSC@faa.gov the information they need to authorize access to the airspace. Coordination with the SOSC may also include a requirement that a drone operator obtain support from the appropriate incident commander.Heres the information the FAA may require:the unmanned aircraft typea PDF copy of a current FAA COAthe pilots Part 107 certificate numberdetails about the proposed flight (date, time, location, altitude, direction and distance to the nearest airport, and latitude/longitude)nature of the event (fire, law enforcement, local/national disaster, missing person) and the pilots qualification information.

FAA's Hurricane Florence Update

September 19 UpdateThe FAA has established a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) over Wilmington, NC, to provide a safe environment for Hurricane Florence response and recovery flights. The TFR is in a 20 nautical mile (23 statute mile) radius of Wilmington International Airport from the ground up to 5,000 feet. Aircraft pilots and drone operators always should check NOTAMs before flying in the area. http://tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_8_4127.htmlThe agency also is reactivating theLow Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC)Fayetteville, Florence, Jacksonville and Wilmington airports in North Carolina and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina today. LAANC enables drone operators to receive real-time airspace authorizations.September 17 UpdateFAA facilities and equipment are returning to normal operations. All commercial service airports have reopened, however, most are conducting limited operations at this time.Commercial passengers:Passengers should be aware that resuming normal airline operations will take time and airlines may not be operating a full flight schedule immediately after the airports reopen.Although airports may be listed as open flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers and employees who work for the airlines or at the airport.As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Monitor fly.faa.gov for current airport status.General Aviation pilots: Pilots always should checkNotices to Airmenbefore a flight. Continue monitoringNOTAMs at https://pilotweb.nas.faa.gov/PilotWeb/, check for Temporary Flight Restrictions at TFR.FAA.govandfollow @FAANews on Twitterfor the latest information. Regardless of where you are flying, always be aware of the weather conditions along your entire planned route.Drone Users: The FAA warns drone operators that flying an unauthorized drone could interfere with local, state and federal rescue and recovery missions. You could be subject to significant fines if you interfere with emergency response operations.Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.September 14 UpdateFor Drone Operators: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Special Notice restricting drone operations supporting Hurricane Florence recovery efforts to an altitude of 200 feet above the ground while operating in North and South Carolina. As a reminder, all drone operators are required to give way to manned aircraft at all times. The FAA turned off the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) system at 11am ET on Friday, September 14, for FAA-towered airports in Hurricane Florences path. LAANC enables drone operators to receive real-time airspace authorizations. We expect to restore LAANC at the affected facilities within 30 days. We disabled LAANC at Fayetteville, Florence, Wilmington and Jacksonville airports in North Carolina and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. September 13 UpdatePilots should check NOTAMS before they fly near the projected path of Hurricane Florence. Most of the airports and air traffic control facilities in the hurricanes path have closed or will close soon in anticipation of the storm. Also, a Special Notice is in effect for the Airspace Coordination Area (ACA) along the southeast coast to support a safe environment for aviation operations including disaster response and recovery flights. NOTAMS are available at: https://pilotweb.nas.faa.gov/PilotWeb/Standard check lists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents.September 12 UpdateThe Federal Aviation Administration closely monitors forecasted hurricanes and severe weather events and prepares FAA facilities and equipment to withstand storm damage. We prepare and protect air traffic control facilities along the projected storm path so we can quickly resume operations after the hurricane passes. Enabling flights to resume quickly is critical to support disaster relief efforts.Commercial TravelersBecause of Hurricane Florence, airlines are likely to cancel many flights in the direct path of the storm and the surrounding areas. Flights that are not cancelled may be delayed. Once Hurricane Florence makes ground fall, airports may be listed as open but flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers, as well as the employees who work for the airlines or at the airport. As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Major carriers provide flight status updates on their website:Southwest AirlinesDelta AirlinesUnited AirlinesAmerican AirlinesJetBlueAlaskaSpiritFrontierAllegiantPlease continue to check the status of your flight with your airline, not the FAA. You can also check the status of some major airports in the storm path by visiting Fly.FAA.gov, which is updated regularly. You can also check current travel advisories provided by most U.S. airlines.Air Traffic ControlFAA control towers in hurricane-prone areas are designed and built to sustain hurricane force winds. Each control tower has a maximum wind sustainability. When the winds approach that level, controllers evacuate the tower cabs. They may remain in the building on duty in a secure lower level, and are ready to go back to work as soon as the storm passes.We also protect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible. As the storm approaches, we disable airport surveillance radar antennas to allow them to spin freely, minimizing potential wind damage. This limits damage to the antenna motors and allows radar coverage to resume quickly after the storm passes.Drone UsersThe FAA warns drone operators that they will be subject to significant fines that may exceed $20,000 and civil penalties if they interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.General Aviation PilotsStandard check lists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents.What DHS and FEMA are DoingWhat the U.S. Government is Doing

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:Thunderstorms could delay flights this afternoon in Chicago (MDW, ORD), Florida and Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP). Low clouds are expected this morning in Los Angeles (LAX), San Francisco (SFO) and Seattle (SEA).Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delayinformation.

New Air Traffic Tower Dedicated in Sarasota, Florida

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority (SMAA), and Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) dedicated the newAir Traffic Control Tower at Sarasota Bradenton International Airport today.The 128 foot-tall tower is a significant investment in our nations airport infrastructure and enhances air traffic controllers ability to provide the safest, most efficient service to flights at the busy Florida airport.The Federal Aviation Administration is proud to celebrate the new tower and our working together with the Sarasota Manatee Airport Authority and Florida Department of Transportation. The new facility will provide our controllers with greater visibility of the airfield and our investment in technology will enhance their ability to provide safe and efficient air traffic services for the Sarasota Bradenton community, said Michael OHarra, Regional Administrator, FAA Southern Region.The FAA, SMAA and FDOT funded the $24.8 million facility under a unique agreement. The FAA invested $7.2 million in the new tower design, engineering and electronic equipment, which the agency installed and will maintain. SMAA funded $8.9 million for construction and it will own and maintain the building. FDOT also contributed $8.7 million for tower construction. The facility includes a 9,000-square-foot base building that houses equipment, administrative offices and training rooms. The new facility includes an updated voice communications system, radio transmitter and flight data processor, which controllers use to communicate with other FAA facilities and the airport.The Airport Authority is proud to have partnered with the FAA and FDOT on this unique opportunity to build a new air traffic control tower. SRQ aviation users, and the local community will benefit from having this new state-of-the-art facility, saidRick Piccolo, President and Chief Executive Officer, Sarasota Bradenton International Airport.Air traffic controllers working in the 525 square-foot tower cab handle flights within a 10-mile radius of the airport up to 4,000 feet in altitude.In 2017, the tower handled 104,540 takeoffs and landings. A total of 34 FAA employees work at the new facility, 20 in air traffic and 14 in technical operations, which maintains the FAA electronics equipment in the tower and on the airfield.

Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.Heads-Up! Did You KnowMore than 25 percent of general aviation fatal accidents occur during the maneuvering phase of flight, which is turning, climbing, or descending close to the ground.More than half of the stall or spin accidents occur in the traffic pattern, usually too close to the ground for recovery.These are ample reasons why you need to brush up on your maneuvering skills.As a pilot, maneuvering flight operations deserve your full attention, especially during:Take-offs, landings, and go-aroundsStalls and spinsFormation, aerobatics, and trainingForced/emergency landingsPhotographyTraining is ImportantRemember your stall and spin training? You need to revisit it frequently. Try practicing stalls, or approaches to stalls, at a safe altitude with an experienced instructor.Remember that turns, either vertical or horizontal, load the wings and increase the stall speed.Other ways to avoid stalls include:Avoid target fixation Focus on flying the airplane, not what is on the ground. Too much focus on the ground can lead to a stall, and you may not recover!No buzzing! Flying low and fast over a target in order to show off your piloting skills is NEVER a good idea and can easily lead to a stall. Buzzing is the cause of 32 percent of maneuvering accidents. Worse yet, theyre usually fatal.Keep Your Priorities StraightFinally, here are some maneuvering tips to remember:The slower you go, the more you need to focus on flying the airplane.Minimize distractions, especially when taking off, approaching, descending, and landing.Review all requirements, procedures, and numbers BEFORE you need to use them.Watch your airspeed, and keep your head in the game.Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.More about Loss of Control:Contributing factors may include:Poor judgment or aeronautical decision makingFailure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective actionIntentional failure to comply with regulationsFailure to maintain airspeedFailure to follow procedurePilot inexperience and proficiencyUse of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcoholDid you know?From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.Learn more:This FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Fact Sheet has more information about maneuvering flight.The FAA Safety Briefing has two articles on maneuvering flight: Getting It Right in Maneuvering Flight in the March/April 2010 issue http://1.usa.gov/1k4CzBG (pdf page 17) and Slow, Steady, Sure in the March/April 2011 issue http://1.usa.gov/1kOqteO (pdf page 22).Pilots may think that maneuvering flight only includes hazardous operations such as buzzing. But, when you fly in the traffic pattern youre also performing maneuvering flight procedures. This AOPA Safety Advisorwill explain the risks and show you how to avoid them.The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Wings Pilot Proficiency Program is always worth a second look. You can also get WINGS credit for taking the FAASTeams online course, ALC-34 Maneuvering: Approach and Landing, at http://1.usa.gov/1pAC9W3.Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now.Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

 
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