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Member Spotlight

Evan Green


Member Since: Jul 15, 2011
Posts: 559
Newest Members

Redlands, CA
Tampico s/n 1189
Espoo, Finland
Tampico s/n 1255
Bregenz, Austria
Trinidad s/n 2121
Merzenich, Germany
Tampico s/n 239
Kaunas, Lithuania
Tobago s/n 696
Sugar Grove, IL
Trinidad s/n 427
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Bombardier Says Mitsubishi ‘Misappropriated’ Data

Bombardier, based in Canada, has sued Mitsubishi Aircraft, of Japan, claiming that some workers recruited from Bombardier by Mitsubishi emailed batches of Bombardier's proprietary information, before they left, to their new employer. The suit was filed last week in a U.S. federal court in Seattle.

'Stunt Rapper' Dies In Wing Walking Accident

A Los Angeles-based “stunt rapper” died Saturday while wing walking for a video shoot in southern British Columbia.

NTSB Calls For 25-Hour CVR Duration

The current requirement for cockpit voice recorders to store just two hours of data is not enough, the NTSB says in a new safety recommendation report, and 25 hours' duration should be required. “These recommendations are derived from the NTSB's experiences with investigations that lacked access to relevant CVR data,” the board said.

China Getting Serious About GA?

After about a decade of saying it was going to happen, China has laid out its plans to create a general aviation segment and it has clearly learned from the experience of others as it lays down the basic infrastructure.

Aircraft Mechanic Facing Theft Charges

A Florida aircraft mechanic has been charged with multiple counts of theft for allegedly removing serviceable parts from aircraft, selling them and charging his customers to replace them with new parts.

Aviation Safety


Download The Full October 2018 Issue PDF

By the time you read this, it’ll be late September or early October. In some regions of the U.S., that means leaves changing color, frost on the pumpkin and winterizing the house, the vehicles and the airplane. In other regions, like where I am, it means shutting off the air conditioning, opening the windows and putting a final close cut on the yard. Cooler, better flying weather, along with some seasonal challenges, likely will confront us all soon.

Unregulated

When the aircraft is equipped with VR-1010-24-1A regulators allowed by Service Instruction 0766-354, Rev II, the overvoltage testing procedure is not achievable. The solid-state voltage regulators are not adjustable to a range (over 31.5v) that will adequately test the overvoltage relays. During a ground run and adjustment of the new voltage regulators, one failed and caused an overvoltage condition. It is this technician’s opinion that the test procedure for the overvoltage relay should be changed to include removing and bench testing the overvoltage relays.

Air In The Tanks

I was flying my Cessna T210R Turbo Centurion from the Westchester County Airport (KHPN) in White Plains, N.Y., to the Dekalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK) in Atlanta, Ga., on a dark night. I departed KHPN IFR but encountered unlimited visibility over North Carolina and cancelled. Before takeoff, I observed line personnel fill both fuel tanks. I had planned to have an hour’s fuel reserve on landing at PDK, and there hadn’t been any unforecast headwinds. However, as I passed over Greenville, S.C., at 12,500 feet, both fuel gauges showed the tanks nearly empty.

NTSB Reports

The pilot-rated passenger later stated he verified that the flaps were down and the three green landing gear lights were illuminated in the cockpit during the approach. Just before landing, he heard the angle of attack indicator alarm. The airplane landed hard, and he heard a loud pop and felt the left main landing gear fracture. The airplane then slid off the left side of the runway, colliding with PAPI lights, and continued sliding until the right wing dug into the ground. The airplane then flipped over and caught fire. The cockpit canopy was jammed, but several observers helped open it and egress the two occupants.

Familiarity, Contempt

If you’ve been flying for very long, it’s likely there’s a route you frequently use. It could be a quick out-and-back to the nearest $100 hamburger or cheapest avgas, or an hours-long trek to Grandma’s house. It’s something you’ve flown often and know well enough to almost do it without a chart. You understand the topography along the way, where the bolt holes are and how any weather may influence the flight. You may even have a couple of the frequencies memorized, along with expected ATC routings.

FAA


Fly Safe: Prevent Loss of Control Accidents

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign helps educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.A Loss of Control (LOC) accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.Medications and FlightMedicine, whether its prescribed or bought over-the-counter, is designed to solve a problem. However, used incorrectly, medicine may create real hazards for pilots. Some drugs can compromise your ability to control the aircraft. These meds can affect your ability to think clearly and make critical decisions quickly and accurately.The FAA is concerned with a medications side effects in you as well as whether your underlying medical condition allows you to be fit for flight. Level with your doctor, and your Aviation Medical Examiner (AME), and tell him or her about your condition. He or she may be able to treat you in a way that will keep you safe, and in the cockpit.Dont Be That PilotA pilot may decide that he or she can control a medicines effects on the body, and decide to fly anyway. Since a medicines effects can be exaggerated at higher altitudes, that plan could be disastrous.Another pilot may choose to withhold information, and not tell his or her AME, that he or he has a condition that could compromise safety. Not only could the undisclosed condition endanger the airman, but the treatment could also create problems through drugs that limit peak performance in the cockpit.You must ensure you are fit for flight, and that means being alert, ready, and free from any limiting medications.You must be honest with your AME and tell him or her about any medical conditions you may have, and any medications you are taking. In some cases, he or she can recommend alternative treatment options that could keep you in the air.Common Meds to Watch ForThe FAA is often asked for a list of approved medications, but the FAA does not publish such a list. The reason is that medications change frequently, and while the FAA may approve medications for some diagnoses, those same medications are not approved for others.What types of side effects should you look out for in medications? One of the most common side effects is drowsiness, which youll often see in antihistamines, a medication used to control allergies. These meds can have powerful sedating effects. In fact, one of them (Benadryl) is often used as a sedative. The NTSB has found that sedating antihistamines are the most common medications found in the bodies of pilots killed in accidents.The second most common sedating drugs are cardiovascular drugs, which include medications for high blood pressure. Some less common drugs include those used to treat diarrhea, seizures, smoking addiction, and depression. Avoid opioids at all times. If you are taking any of these drugs, work with your doctor and/or AME to see if you can find an alternative.Dont fly while using a medication with which youve previously experienced a negative side effect.If you are using an FAA-approved medication for the first time, see how it affects you before taking flight. Wait 48 hours after taking it and see if you are fit for flight.For additional information go to: https://www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilotsafetybrochures/media/Meds_brochure.pdfWhat if I Have a Medical Condition?If you have a condition that would disqualify or prevent you from flying, talk to your doctor and/or AME. See if any alternatives are available that will keep you safe.Message from Acting FAA Administrator Daniel Elwell:The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #FlySafe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.More about Loss of Control:Contributing factors may include:Poor judgment or aeronautical decision makingFailure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective actionIntentional failure to comply with regulationsFailure to maintain airspeedFailure to follow procedurePilot inexperience and proficiencyUse of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcoholDid you know?From October 2016 through September 2017, 247 people died in 209 general aviation accidents.Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.Learn more:This FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) Fact Sheet has more information about Pilots and Medications.Learn more about the possible side effects of common allergy medications in this AOPA bulletin.This Skybrary article discusses the effects of drugs and alcohol on pilot performance.Time is getting short!!The FAAs Equip ADS-B website gives you the information you need to equip now including information about the ADS-B Rebate Program.Curious about FAA regulations (Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations)? Its a good idea to stay on top of them. You can find current FAA regulations on this website.TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars, and more on key general aviation safety topics.TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:The weather today is expected to be mostly clear and calm for air travel across the country. Wind may slow flights at New Yorks LaGuardia Airport (LGA), while clouds could lead to delays in San Francisco (SFO) and Seattle (SEA).Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delayinformation.

FAA Announces $40.9 Million for New Tower at GSO

Washington, DCThe U.S. Department of Transportations Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is investing $40.9 million in infrastructure for Piedmont Triad International Airport (GSO) in Greensboro, NC. The Agency is building a new, 180-foot-tall Air Traffic Control Tower.The new control tower will accommodate up to eight positions for air traffic controllers in a 550- square-foot tower cab. A 15,650 square-foot base building will anchor the new tower. It will house the Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) with up to 10 radar positions for air traffic controllers. It will be equipped with state-of-the-art automation and communications systems. The base building also will include administrative offices and a training classroom. Construction will begin in early 2019, and the FAA expects to commission the facility in early 2022.The new tower will allow air traffic controllers to manage flights safely and efficiently at North Carolinas third busiest airport. Greensboro Tower controlled 84,600 flights, and the TRACON handled 155,000 radar operations in the 12 months ending on Sept. 1, 2018.The FAA awarded the construction contract to Archer Western Construction, LLC, of Chicago, IL. The new facility will replace the existing 90-foot-tall tower that has been in operation since 1974.

Hurricane Michael: Information for Drone Operators

October 12 UpdateDrone Users: The FAA warns drone operators that flying an unauthorized drone could interfere with local, state and federal rescue and recovery missions. You could be subject to significant fines if you interfere with emergency response operations.Flying a dronewithout authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference._____________________________________________________________October 9 UpdateTheFederal Aviation Administration(FAA) is warning drone owners and operators that they will be subject to significant fines that may exceed $20,000 if they interfere with emergency response operations in the areas affected by Hurricane Michael.Many aircraft that are conducting life-saving missions and other critical response and recovery efforts are likely to be flying at low altitudes over areas affected by the storm. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may unintentionally disrupt rescue operations and violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTemporary Flight Restriction(TFR) is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.Government agencies with anFAA Certificate of Authorization(COA) or flying underPart 107, as well as private sector Part 107 drone operators who want to support response and recovery operations, are strongly encouraged to coordinate their activities with the local incident commander responsible for the area in which they want to operate.If drone operators need to fly in controlled airspace or a disaster TFR to support the response and recovery, operatorsmustcontact the FAAs System Operations Support Center (SOSC) by emailing9-ATOR-HQ-SOSC@faa.govtheinformationthey need to authorize access to the airspace. Coordination with the SOSC may also include a requirement that a drone operator obtain support from the appropriate incident commander.Heres the information the FAA may require:the unmanned aircraft typea PDF copy of a current FAA COAthe pilots Part 107 certificate numberdetails about the proposed flight (date, time, location, altitude, direction and distance to the nearest airport, and latitude/longitude)nature of the event (fire, law enforcement, local/national disaster, missing person) and the pilots qualification information.

FAA's Hurricane Michael Update

October 12 UpdateFAA facilities and equipment are returning to normal operations following Hurricane Michael. All airports have reopened, however, operations may be limited at this time.Commercial passengers:Passengers should be aware that resuming normal airline operations will take time and airlines may not be operating a full flight schedule immediately after the airports reopen.Although airports may be listed as open flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers and employees who work for the airlines or at the airport.As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security, and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Monitor fly.faa.gov for current airport status.General Aviation pilots: Pilots always should checkNotices to Airmenbefore a flight. Continue monitoringNOTAMs, check for Temporary Flight Restrictions, andfollow@FAANews on Twitterfor the latest information. Regardless of where you are flying, always be aware of the weather conditions along your entire planned route.Drone Users: The FAA warns drone operators that flying an unauthorized drone could interfere with local, state and federal rescue and recovery missions. You could be subject to significant fines if you interfere with emergency response operations.Flying a dronewithout authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances.Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference._____________________________________________________________October 9 UpdateThe Federal Aviation Administration closely monitors forecasted hurricanes and severe weather events and prepares FAA facilities and equipment to withstand storm damage. We prepare and protect air traffic control facilities along the projected storm path so we can quickly resume operations after the hurricane passes. Enabling flights to resume quickly is critical to support disaster relief efforts.Commercial TravelersBecause of Hurricane Michael, airlines are likely to cancel many flights in the direct path of the storm and the surrounding areas. Flights that are not cancelled may be delayed. Once Hurricane Michael makes ground fall, airports may be listed as open but flooding on local roadways may limit access to airports for passengers, as well as the employees who work for the airlines or at the airport. As a result, every aspect of your trip to the airport, including parking, checking in, getting through security and boarding may take longer than usual.As always, check with airlines about the status of your flight before you leave for the airport. Major carriers provide flight status updates on their website:Southwest AirlinesDelta AirlinesUnited AirlinesAmerican AirlinesJetBlueAlaskaSpiritFrontierAllegiantPlease continue to check the status of your flight with your airline, not the FAA. You can also check the status of some major airports in the storm path by visitingFly.FAA.gov, which is updated regularly. You can also checkcurrent travel advisoriesprovided by most U.S. airlines.Air Traffic ControlFAA control towers in hurricane-prone areas are designed and built to sustain hurricane force winds. Each control tower has a maximum wind sustainability. When the winds approach that level, controllers evacuate the tower cabs. They may remain in the building on duty in a secure lower level, and are ready to go back to work as soon as the storm passes.We also protect communications equipment and navigational aids to the greatest extent possible. As the storm approaches, we disable airport surveillance radar antennas to allow them to spin freely, minimizing potential wind damage. This limits damage to the antenna motors and allows radar coverage to resume quickly after the storm passes.Drone UsersThe FAA warns drone operators that they will be subject to significant fines that may exceed $20,000 and civil penalties if they interfere with emergency response operations. Flying a drone without authorization in or near the disaster area may violate federal, state, or local laws and ordinances, even if aTemporary Flight Restriction(TFR) is not in place. Allow first responders to save lives and property without interference.General Aviation PilotsStandard check lists are even more important in and around severe weather. Be aware of weather conditions throughout the entire route of your planned flight. A pilots failure to recognize deteriorating weather conditions continues to cause or contribute to accidents.What DHS and FEMA are DoingWhat the U.S. Government is Doing