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Member Spotlight

Wayman Alfredo Luy


Member Since: Nov 11, 2006
Posts: 284
Newest Members

Hull, United Kingdom
Tobago XL s/n 1634
La Rochelle, France
Trinidad s/n 1181
Pomona, CA
Trinidad TC s/n 685
Angmering, United Kingdom
Trinidad s/n 378
Leighton Buzzard, United Kingdom
Tobago s/n 58
Tiburon, CA
Trinidad s/n 1676
 

Welcome to the Socata TB Users Group!

This site is dedicated to providing information and support on Socata's TB range of general aviation aircraft.

The primary mission of the Group is to provide members with information and assistance that will help keep Socata-built airplanes flying - safely and affordably, and to provide a forum for Socata pilots to discuss issues that effect them.

Here you will find the latest information on the TB fleet, user information and stories and pictures of users with their aircraft as well as a gateway to the "members only" message board where you can exchange tips and information with other TB Users.

Aviation News

AVWEB


Boom Technology Raises Additional Capital to Support Supersonic Demonstrator

Centennial Airport based Boom Technology, would-be maker of the first supersonic airliner since the Concorde, has raised an additional $33 million to fund development of its 1/3 scale demonstration aircraft, the XB-1, according to a company press release. An SEC filing on Tuesday reported that the company had raised $41.9 million, though $7.9 million of that probably reflects a restructuring of amounts previously raised. Boom CEO and founder Blake Scholl says "our mission is to make supersonic flight a reality," and expects to see the XB-1 close to ready to fly in the next year.

Vintage Wings Selling Hawk One

One of the best flying examples of an F-86 Sabre is for sale by its Canadian owner for the seemingly bargain price of $795,000 USD. Vintage Wings of Canada is selling its Canadair MK-V Sabre, named Hawk One, which has been used as an air demonstration aircraft since 2009.

Vintage Air Rally Completes Trip from Greece to South Africa; Gears Up for Tour of Americas

Of the 19 aircraft that set out from Crete, Greece on November 12, 14 survivors of the Crete2Cape Vintage Air Rally arrived in Cape Town, South Africa after 8,000 miles and over a month of flying. The pre-WWII aircraft were the first to land at the Egyptian Pyramids at Giza in 80 years and the first to receive permission for level overflight of Victoria Falls on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe. Those failing to complete included a Boeing Stearman, piloted by John Ordway and his daughter Isabella, which was destroyed in a forced landing 80 miles from Nairobi following a total engine failure.

Big Birthday Celebration For Baby Boeing

The Museum of Flight in Seattle is hosting a 50th birthday party for the littlest Boeing commercial airplane, the 737, on April 9. Brien Wygle, pilot-in-command for the maiden flight, is expected to attend, along with 737 engineers Bob Bogash and Peter Morton and Boeing historian Mike Lombardi. Bob Bogash was also Crew Chief for the restoration of the original aircraft, registered as N73700, which is a permanent exhibit at the Museum of Flight. Boeing will be providing a new 737 MAX for viewing during the celebration, which is scheduled to take off at 1:15 p.m., 50 years to the minute from N73700's maiden flight.

FAA 20-Year Forecast Predicts Gradual Decline In Light GA

Piston-single fleet size and hours flown are expected to decrease roughly 0.8 annually over the next 20 years, says the FAA in its annual Aerospace Forecast. The Aerospace Forecast predicts that general aviation hours flown for all aircraft types will grow slowly, possibly eclipsing 2007 levels by the end of the next decade, with the overwhelming majority of that growth in the fixed-wing turbine sector. Rotorcraft, LSA and experimental usage are forecast to grow modestly over that time period.

Aviation Safety


Nuts

Inspection after aircraft received from paint shop found left elevator actuating rod nut unpinned and backed off almost completely, with its bolt backing out. Left aileron outboard hinge was not attached. Hinge plate pinched between skin. Aileron binding. This aircraft was flown in this condition.

Fly It Like You Stole It?

I am still a student, but after a long time and many obstacles, I’m finally getting close to my checkride. Along the way, I’ve had a few experiences, one of which started with me basically stealing the airplane.

NTSB Reports: April 2017

At about 0937 Mountain time, the airplane was destroyed when it collided with mountainous terrain. The private pilot and three passengers were fatally injured. Instrument conditions prevailed. Radar data show the airplane reached its cruising altitude of approximately 8000 feet msl some 12 minutes after takeoff. The airplane subsequently descended about 1300 feet in one minute before entering a momentary climb, which was followed by a shallow descent. In the remaining two and a half minutes, the airplane maintained a 300 fpm descent rate, with some intermittent climbs. The final two radar targets show the airplane climbed about 425 feet in 12 seconds. The airplane maintained a straight track from its departure airport to the last radar target, which was within 0.1 nm of the 6670 feet msl accident site.

All Of The Performance

Most of us fly from nice, long, level and wide paved runways with minimal obstructions. Whether for fun, variety or vocation, others of us use less-developed runways and airports, most notably back-country airstrips. All of us know that whenever we’re off the beaten path—a term holding different meanings for different people—the risk of whatever flight operations we engage in goes up. While I’ve done my share of off-pavement operations, most of them were to or from well-maintained grass runways with clear approach and departure paths, or from sometimes-remote lakes using a seaplane. So I’m a little familiar with the “roll your own” style of flight operations in which many pilots engage.

Drone Sightings Update

The FAA in late February released an updated list of reports detailing sightings of unmanned aircraft systems, or drones. The sightings were reported by pilots, air traffic controllers, law enforcement personnel and citizens concerned the drones posed the threat of potential collisions or other encounters with the drones. The latest data covers February through September 2016, and includes a sharp increase—1274 new reports compared with 874 for the same period in 2015.

FAA


FAA Air Traffic Report

Today's Air Traffic Report:Wind may delay flights today in Chicago (MDW, ORD), Dallas-Fort Worth (DAL, DFW), Houston (HOU, IAH) and the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA). Thunderstorms could contribute toslowarrivaltraffic in the DFW areathrough the morning hoursand in Houstonlater this afternoon.A mix of weather and low clouds may cause delays in Denver (DEN), Los Angeles (LAX) and Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP), with additional traffic volumecausing additional delaysin Los Angeles.For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Clock is Ticking for 2017 UAS Symposium Registration

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reminds everyone there is less than a week left to register at a discounted rate for the 2017 UAS Symposium, which will take place at the Hyatt Regency in Reston, VA, from March 27 to 29.The FAA and Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) are co-sponsors of this years Symposium, which will bring together representatives from government, industry and academia to discuss the fast-growing unmanned aircraft (UAS) community. Nearly two dozen panels, breakout sessions and workshops are scheduled for the three-day event.Last years first UAS Symposium in Daytona Beach, FL, drew nearly 500 interested participants and gave the FAA wide-ranging viewpoints that are helping inform the agencys long-term planning for UAS integration. The 2017 event promises to be even more valuable for all the participants and their organizations.FAA Administrator Michael Huerta will deliver the keynote address on March 27. Other featured speakers include Acting FAA Deputy Administrator Victoria Wassmer, AUVSI President & CEO Brian Wynne and FAA UAS Integration Office Director Earl Lawrence.Visit our page for more information about this years symposium and to register.Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #UAS2017

FAA Forecasts Continued Growth in Air Travel

March 21 The FAA today released its annual Aerospace Forecast Report Fiscal Years 2017 to 2037, which projects sustained and continued growth in nearly every aspect of air transportation from general aviation private flying to large commercial airline passenger levels.In commercial air travel, Revenue Passenger Miles (RPMs) are considered the benchmark for measuring aviation growth.An RPM represents one revenue passenger traveling one mile. The FAA forecast calls for system RPMs by mainline and regional air carriers to grow at an average rate of 2.4 percent per year between 2016 and 2037, with international RPMs projected for average annual increases of 3.4 percent per year. System RPMs are forecast to increase 65 percent during the 20-year forecast.A key new portion of the forecast focuses on the growth in the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), also known as drones. The FAA projects the small model hobbyist UAS fleet to more than triple in size from an estimated 1.1 million vehicles at the end of 2016 to more than 3.5 million units by 2021.The commercial, non-hobbyist UAS fleet is forecast to grow from 42,000 at the end of 2016 to about 442,000 aircraft by 2021, with an upside possibility of as many as 1.6 million UAS in use by 2021.Pilots of these UAS vehicles are expected to increase from 20,000 at the end of 2016 to a range of 10 to 20 times as many by 2021.Predictions for small UAS are more difficult to develop given the dynamic, quickly-evolving market. The FAA has provided high and low ranges around the hobbyist forecast, reflecting uncertainty about the publics continued adoption of this new technology. The FAAs non-hobbyist (commercial) UAS fleet size forecasts contain certain broad assumptions about operating limitations for small UAS during the next five years based on the basic constraints of the existing regulations: daytime operations, within visual line of sight, and a single pilot operating only one small UAS at a time. he main difference in the high and low end of the forecasts is differing assumptions about how quickly the regulatory environment will evolve, enabling more widespread routine uses of UAS for commercial purposes.The FAA utilizes a variety of economic data and projections to develop its annual forecast, such as generally accepted projections for the nations Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The FAA annual forecast is consistently considered the industry-wide standard of U.S. aviation-related activities.The report looks at all facets of air travel including commercial airlines, air cargo, private general aviation, and fleet sizes.Read the FAA Aviation Forecast Fact Sheet.Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #FAAForecast

Data Comm Comes to New York

March16DataComm, theNextGentechnology thatenhances safety and reduces delays by dramatically improving the way air traffic controllers and pilots talk to each other, is up and running at five airports in the New York metropolitan area: JFK, LaGuardia, Newark,Teterboroand Westchester. These airports were among the first to receive the critical system upgrade.The new technology supplements radio voice communication, enabling controllers and pilots to transmit important information such as clearances, revised flight plans and advisories with the touch of a button.DataCommis helping to keep flights departing on time throughout the New York area, saidFAADeputy Assistant Administrator for NextGen Pamela Whitley. This significantly improvesflight operationsthroughout the nations airspace, since one-third of all flights in this country each day fly to, from or through New York airspace.Members of the mediatodaytoured the air traffic control towerat JFKand ajetBlue aircraftfor a working demonstration of DataCommfrom the perspective of controllers and pilots.Officialsfrom the FAA,jetBlue, the National AirTraffic Controllers Associationand the Professional Aviation Safety Specialistswere on hand. The improved efficiency provided by DataCommsavesan average of 13 minutes per flight in New York during times ofheavy trafficcongestion, typically caused by bad weather.More than 7,500 flightsreceive the benefits of DataCommeachmonth atthe New Yorkarea airports a number that continues to grow. Data Comm last year improved the flying experience for 10.6 million passengers on 70,000 flights departing from New York.The technology is being used by eight other U.S. operators in New York American, Alaska, Delta, Fed Ex, Southwest, United, UPS and Virgin America and 22 international airlines. DataCommis installed in 31 different types of aircraft.Voice communications can be time consuming and labor intensive. For example,when planes are awaiting takeoff,controllersmust use a two-way radio to issuenew routesto pilots to help them avoid bad weather.This process can take 30minutes or more,depending on how many aircraft are in line for departure. It also introduces thepotential for miscommunicationknown as readback/hearback error.By contrast, flight crews on planes using DataCommreceive revised flight plansfrom the controllersvia digital messages.The crews review the new clearances and accept the updated instructions with the push of a button. Planes keep their spots in the takeoff line or may even be taken out of line and sent ahead enabling them to departon time.DataCommis nowoperationalat 55 air traffic control towersnationwide,following a rollout that wasunder budget and more than two and ahalf years ahead of schedule.The budget savings will enable the FAA to deploy DataCommat seven airports in addition to the 55 listed below.AlbuquerqueAtlantaAustinBaltimore-WashingtonBostonBurbankCharlotteChicago OHareChicago MidwayClevelandDallas-Ft. WorthDallas LoveDenverDetroitFort LauderdaleHouston BushHouston HobbyIndianapolisKansas CityLas VegasLos AngelesLouisvilleMemphisMiamiMinneapolis-St. PaulMilwaukeeNashvilleNewarkNew OrleansNew York John F. KennedyNew York LaGuardiaOaklandOntarioOrlandoPhiladelphiaPhoenixPittsburghPortlandRaleigh-DurhamSacramentoSan JuanSt. LouisSalt Lake CitySan AntonioSan DiegoSan FranciscoSan JoseSanta AnaSeattleTampaTeterboroWashington DullesWashington ReaganWestchester CountyWindsor Locks (Bradley)

Data Comm Now Reducing Delays at Miami

March 6 Data Comm, the NextGen technology that is revolutionizing communication between air traffic controllers and pilots, is now helping to enhance safety and reduce departure delays at Miami International Airport, the 12th busiest airport in North America and the largest gateway to Latin America.The new technology supplements radio voice communication, enabling controllers and pilots to transmit important information including clearances, revised flight plans and advisories with the touch of a button.Data Comm represents a whole new era of communications between controllers and pilots, said Jim Eck, the FAAs Assistant Administrator for NextGen. This translates directly into safer, more efficient operations, helping aircraft take off and reach their destinations on time.Voice communications can be time consuming and labor intensive. For example, when planes are awaiting takeoff, controllers must use a two-way radio to issue new routes to the pilots to help them avoid bad weather. This process can take 30 minutes or more, depending on how many aircraft are in line for departure, and also has the potential for miscommunication known as readback/hearback error.By contrast, flight crews on planes using Data Comm receive revised flight plans from the controllers via digital messages. The crews review the new clearances and accept the updated instructions with the push of a button. Planes keep their spots in the takeoff line or may even be taken out of line and sent ahead enabling them to depart on time.Data Comm is now operational at 55 air traffic control towers, following a rollout that was under budget and more than two and a half years ahead of schedule:AlbuquerqueAtlantaAustinBaltimore-WashingtonBostonBurbankCharlotteChicago OHareChicago MidwayClevelandDallas-Ft. WorthDallas LoveDenverDetroitFort LauderdaleHouston BushHouston HobbyIndianapolisKansas CityLas VegasLos AngelesLouisvilleMemphisMiamiMinneapolis-St. PaulMilwaukeeNashvilleNewarkNew OrleansNew York John F. KennedyNew York LaGuardiaOaklandOntarioOrlandoPhiladelphiaPhoenixPittsburghPortlandRaleigh-DurhamSacramentoSan JuanSt. LouisSalt Lake CitySan AntonioSan DiegoSan FranciscoSan JoseSanta AnaSeattleTampaTeterboroWashington DullesWashington ReaganWestchester CountyWindsor Locks (Bradley)

Upcoming Events

2017 UK TB Gathering Popham, UK May 27-29, 2017
2017 European Social Weekend Gloucestershire (EGBJ) Jun 9-11, 2017